Vomiting Symptom, Vomiting Bile

Vomiting in cats is not uncommon. Cats often vomit hair balls, grass, and foregn objects that have not been digested and caused irritation to the stomach. Vomitus may consist of undigested food material (if swallowed whole), partly digested or even liquid, and may be clear, yellow (bile stained) or brown (food colored). 3 Vomiting with a small amount of bile once or twice a week is common in longhaired cats. Cats also vomit after a heavy meal followed by energetic exercise. Some cats are prone to motion sickness that may cause vomiting. Chronic vomiting is a common sign of inflammatory bowel disease in cats.

But vomiting can also signal digestive system problems which, in turn, are not the only cause of vomiting. Many disorders and disease can cause chronic vomiting in cats:

  • Diseases of the endocrine system
  • Diseases of the urinary tract
  • Diseases of the nervous system
  • Diseases of the reproductive tract
  • Enterogastric reflux (bilious vomiting syndrome)
  • Internal arasites, especially heartworms and Physaloptera preputialis worms
  • Certain drugs and toxic substances can cause vomiting. These include: pesticides, household cleaning substances, antifreeze, some OTC drugs, such as aspirin


  • Diseases of the liver and gallbladder
  • Diseases of the pancreas
  • Malignant tumors
  • Metabolic diseases such as hyperthyroidism, ketoacidotic diabetes mellitus or Addison's disease
  • Cardiomyopathy or congestive heart failure
  • Systemic illness or infection affecting the CRTZ or cortex (e.g. septicemia) 3

Uncontrollable vomiting is an emergency situation. If a cat vomits over a period of several weeks, has poor appetite, loses weight, and looks depressed, kidney or liver disease should be suspected.

References

  1. Jane Fishman Leon. Feline: medicine & disease prevention
  2. Gastrointestinal Parasites of Cats
  3. Debra L Zoran. Problem-Based Feline Medicine





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