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    Irish Setter (Red Setter)

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    History & Overview

    Irish Setters were developed in Ireland in the 18th century as a net and falcon setter. The Red setter was always revered as an amazing hunting dog. His ability to search out and find birds, especially in the rough country, is probably unsurpassed in the dog world. But he is not an easy dog to train and requires a lot of patience. He is fast, thorough and endlessly enthusiastic.

    Roles

    Nowadays, he is used for hunting woodcock, partridge, pheasant, wild duck and teal, and can be trained to work as a pointer as well as a setter.

    Character

    The Irish Setters are very independent. They can be real stubborn and temperamental. Early consistent training is highly recommended. With their families, they are trustworthy and loyal. However, this is a working breed which needs lots of daily exercise and is regarded by many as unsuitable for apartment living.

    At A Glance

    Other Names:

    Red Dog, Red setter

    Country of Origin:

    Ireland

    Utilization:

    Hunting and companion dog

    Classifications:

    FCI Classification: Group 7: Pointers & Setters; British and Irish Pointers and Setters (with working trial)
    AKC Classification: Sporting Group

    Size:

    Large (25 – 27 inches at shoulder)

    Colors:

    Rich chestnut with no trace of black; white on chest, throat, and toes; or small star on forehead or narrow streak or blaze on nose or face.

    Litter Size:

    9

    Life Span:

    10 – 14 years

    Grooming Requirements:

    The coat should be regularly brushed to keep it free of dirt and mats. Special attention should be given to ears.

    Shedding:

    Little

    Personality:

    Keen, intelligent, energetic, affectionate and loyal.

    Social skills:

    Peaceful with other animals

    Suitability for Children:

    Very good with children of all ages

    Exercise Needs:

    This is a high energy breed and it is not recommended for apartment life. Irish Setters need a lots of daily exercise or they can become hyperactive, destructive and generally unruly.

    Train Ability:

    Very trainable and eager to please, but they can be hard to housebreak.

    Health & Behavioral Issues:

    Video Credits: AnimalWised

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